How to Immediately Reach Key Decision Makers with Cold Calls

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Reach Key Decision Makers with Cold Calls

Reaching key decision makers with cold calls is like passing a thread through the eye of a needle. It has become pretty difficult yet certainly possible sales tactic. With too many salespeople eager to get deals, decision makers have tried to shun them. Quite often, you see marketers or freelance cold callers rummaging through the gatekeepers with little or no knowledge about how cold calling works.

key decision makers with cold calls

The trouble is, some of the marketers only seek for approval—desperate to turn their businesses around. And always forget that these gatekeepers are not a hurdle but a significant stepping stone to get the deal.

So now, you may be ready to dial on with a new mindset. Here are creative ways to get in front of decision makers that will surely boost your successful client contact ratios.

A gatekeeper is not a decision-maker

Never assume that gatekeepers will listen to the whole pitch you prepared. Introduce the reason of the call and the benefit of the product/service you can offer. In that way, the gatekeeper will know if you’re selling what their company needs.

Now, don’t underestimate the role of a gatekeeper—the secretary or the front-line person. As today’s gatekeepers are well-trained and professional enough to handle first-base decisions. They also know how to deal with salespeople who don’t know how to open a call. So it’s going to be the end of your sales career if you belittle them.

  • Most of the gatekeepers today are highly educated and may have knowledge and experience in sales.
  • They also have the power if you can make the call or not to the decision maker. So, be extra careful.
  • Nowadays, gatekeepers intend to pick a type of salespeople that won’t most likely annoy the decision maker. In other words, they have the power and authority too.
  • Many of these gatekeepers may be the trusted member of the company, that’s why they are put in the frontline, to uphold access and ward off sleazy sales.

 

A short yet unique selling point

Don’t spew too much information and drown the decision maker with trivial features or benefits that don’t really tell how you product or service works. The rule of thumb is “to never pitch your product to the gatekeeper” (remember: a gatekeeper is not decision maker). Majority of these gatekeepers have no time to spare for a chitchat. And once you’ve gotten access to the gatekeeper, business means business.

So what’s in it for them?

At the heart of your pitch should be the benefits—not only features—of your service or product. What makes you different from other competitors? Research and learn about the relevant insights and updates of your industry. Keep your message short and only highlight the crucial details. You can use pointers and bullets to keep the call clear and quick.

the decision maker

Cold Calling Handful Tips and Tricks

Cold calling is a powerful sales tactic if used properly. Using these ideas will help on how to get to the decision maker and gatekeeper on the phone. So next time you’ll call, you can be confident to get the deal.

1. Schedule your call at the right time.

Some calls failed due to the wrong hour of day, or the prospect’s too busy with other matters.

2. Research about the prospect’s business.

Learn how to gather data and insights about the particular industry and use this to personalize your call.

3. Rehearse your prepared script.

To make sure you can execute your call perfectly, you have to practice your script. Avoid talking like a mechanical bot—be comfortable with the script.

4. Listen closely.

Don’t talk when the prospect talks. The best way to convince decision makers is to listen and respond wisely. Gain insights from their problems and provide quick solutions.

5. Persistence is the key.

Call more lead to get more chances of closing an appointments. Don’t get so easily discourage with rejections. With cold calls, reach decision makers by refining your tactics along the way.

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